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Grey Sparrow Journal

Issue 30, July 31, 2017
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Chirps from the Sparrow


 

Our spring issue offers an impressionist painting of Mary Cassatt on the Editors’ webpage. Why do I mention this? Cassatt has inadvertently impacted my personal as well as my professional life.  And you may ask how.

 

Randall eyed Painter Cassatt and said, "Say, she looks just like you, although your derrière is smaller."

 

"That's a bustle," I said. "You deserve a dinner of fried snerf with baked rutabaga," a dish he refuses to eat.

 

 Nah, you don't really want those lemon cream cookies and bars!

 

The last one Randall shared with me was in 1982, “For a fat girl, you don’t sweat much.”  Randall's parallel between Mary and me, actually, is a large improvement from the past. I was only 110 pounds then.  I suspect you never guessed the Sparrow could motivate one to diet—hopefully with a reduction in pounds, not words. 


This year has been pivotal; we are growing exponentially; I hope up, not out. The writing and art that come to us are exquisite and I find we must say no to some work that absolutely rocks the solar system. Why? We just can’t publish one hundred plus poems, stories, and flash each quarter; how I wish we could. So, please realize, if your writing, art, or photography is not accepted, it may have nothing to do with the quality—just the reality of space and time—and it may well be accepted elsewhere—and your new submissions may be accepted in the future at the Sparrow.

Our pages are filled with light after a long and difficult winter. There are a number of Sparrows who will make you smile, laugh, chirp, whimper, sniffle … and cry. Robert Bly has graciously shared a new poem with us—his presence deeply appreciated. Tsipi Keller delivered three utterly, ah, well, yes, utterly absurd and ridiculous flash fictions with the nip of truth—as we allude to the life Horace mentioned—always throwing in some nonsense and fun. Robert Wexelblatt’s story is unique and should leave you at peace with the adolescent world; lest there be concern young teens have gone astray;  "Edith Fevrier" offers more than a few chuckles. Peter Ciccariello’s art work has graced our cover of  Snow Jewel this March:our first poetry chapbook. John Roche review of Hugh Fox’s Approaching: Poems of Brazil, written in Portuguese and English, is included this spring. 

 

I believe you will be happily surprised at the work chosen from a large basket of beautifully crafted, well-written treats and toys.

Again, deep appreciation goes out to our volunteers, Copy Editor Annam Manthiram and Technical Editor Joseph Michael Owens, our reviewers, and most of all, our readers.  And Annam will continue to offer interviews as her time permits and Joe is our Man on Campus

 

                                                                                                                                                                —Diane Smith